Word: 5 Things You Should Know About Hyperlinks

Have you ever created a hyperlink in a Word document? For the most part, this is a fairly straightforward process. That said, there are a few hidden gems in the hyperlink options that you may not have explored. Let’s check it out.

Place in This Document tab

Applying a Link

A quick review: to create a hyperlink in a Microsoft Office program, start by selecting the word(s) where you would like to apply the link, and then either…

Right click and select Link (or Hyperlink):

Right click menu, link selected

… or remember that one of my favorite shortcuts for accessing this hyperlink popup is Ctrl + K. This shortcut works in a wide variety of programs, so it is worth memorizing!

You will arrive at this familiar screen…

Text selected: Insert Hyperlink menu displayed

It is this Insert Hyperlink popup screen that I would like to explore with you today.

1. File or Webpage

In the Insert Hyperlink screen, the most common goal is to link to a webpage, so conveniently that is the default view.

Webpage

To link to a webpage, paste the webpage address into the Address field and click OK.

Web address pasted into menu bar

File

A lesser known option in this default view is the ability to link your words to a file.

Note that, in the box above where you paste your hyperlink, you can instead select folders and files from your list and the address will populate  a location of the file.

Link to file locations

After you create this type of link, clicking on the link will open the file you selected. How cool!

Be cautious with this option. If your goal is to send this document to others, the link may not behave correctly if they don’t have access to the file location.

2. Place in this Document

On the left side of the Insert Hyperlink page, notice that there are additional tabs. Here you have options beyond a simple web address or file location.

The first one I want to show you is my favorite: Place in This Document. There is so much you can do with this powerful tool.

Place in This Document tab

Glancing at this tab doesn’t always tell you what you need to know, however. Here are the basics:

Location Options

You have several choices for linking to a Place in This Document.

Top of the Document

One option you will always have is a Top of Document option.

Place in this Document OptionsThis is very handy for “Back to Top” links for ease of navigation in long documents.

Back to Top link

Headings

Another wonderful way to navigate is by utilizing Styles. If you would like to learn more about Styles, I hope to see you at a Word Essentials training, where we cover Styles in great detail!

Styles in the Home Tab

If you would like to utilize Styles to link to a location in your document:

1. Use Styles to apply Headings to your document.

2. Revisit your Insert Hyperlink options

3. Look under the  Headings section of the Place in This Document tab.

Headings with Headers applied to a couple sections

This is extremely helpful if you are referencing different locations within a large file and would like your readers to be able to easily skip ahead or back to specific sections.

Section 2 link created from Headers

One caveat… sometimes if you have heavily modified a header (also discussed in Word Essentials), you may find that it does not appear in the Headings list. This is where the next trick comes in handy…

Bookmarks

In addition to utilizing Headers, you can bookmark any location within your document and link back to this location with a hyperlink.

1. Place your cursor where you would like to insert the bookmark.

2. Go to the Insert tab, Links group, and select Bookmark.

Insert tab, bookmark

3. In the popup that appears, name your bookmark (no spaces may be used), and press Add.

Bookmark popup screen

4. Revisit the Insert Hyperlink popup and select the bookmark from the Bookmarks section to create a link to the location.

Bookmarks in Insert Hyperlink popup

3. Create New Document

The next option on the left is Create New Document.

Create New Document Prompt

If you select this option, the link will create a New Word file in your Documents Folder. You have further choices to name this document, and choose whether the link will prompt you to edit the document now or later.

Note: As with the File example, people would need access to the path (save location) for this link to work.

4. Generate an Email

Email Address is the last tab on the left side of the Insert Hyperlink popup. Select this option and enter an email address and subject line.

Email Address tab with email address and subject line created

When you create a link with this setting, clicking on the link will open Outlook, or the user’s default mail program, and create a new email to the specified address, with the specified subject line.

Email created in Outlook

5. Target Frame Options

We have talked in detail about the tabs on the left of the Insert Hyperlink popup, but there is one item on the right that I want to mention: Target Frame. In other words, how would you like your link to behave as it opens?

Target frame on right side of Insert Hyperlink screen

This option is something you will likely care more about if your end goal is to publish this document online somewhere; exporting it as html or PDF, or utilizing cloud services to publish and share a document to be opened in browser.

The most common selection I see people utilize in this screen is New Window, for when you want the original document to remain on its own tab when your readers click on the link, while the linked content will open in a new browser tab.

Frame options

Thoughts?

What do you think, does this open up some new possibilities for utilizing hyperlinks in your document? I would love to hear from you!

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

  • David Gomez
  • LaDawna Hobkirk
  • Judi McBroom
  • Amy Smith
  • Brittany Ulmer
  • Carrie Wyatt

Teams: New Meeting Experience

If you have attended Teams Essentials training, you may remember when we talked about where to visit to see the latest updates in Teams. This software is evolving so quickly, many of you notice new features every time you log in! Here is one I didn’t want you to miss: the New Meeting Experience.

Dropdown options, different views, as described

The Old Meeting Experience

If you have already been meeting in Teams, you are used to a view that looks something like the image below.

Features and controls can be accessed by hovering your mouse in the center of the Teams screen and selecting from a menu that appears in the center.

Old layout

Also, perhaps somewhat frustratingly, the old meeting view opens up within your Teams program. Navigating within Teams during the meeting shrinks down the meeting view to a small square in the corner of the Teams screen. Many were not crazy about this tiny screen.

The New Meeting Experience

There is a lot to be excited  about with this new meeting view. Here is a run down:

Popped Out View

Perhaps what I am most excited about is the new meeting view is a popped out view! Yes, meetings are in a new screen entirely. This leaves the rest of your Teams application free for easy navigation, while still maximizing the size of your meeting screen.

Popped out view

Menu Changes

The Menu has moved from the center to the upper right, where you will find all your favorite options from the old meeting view…

Menu in upper right

…plus some new ways to view participants, like large gallery and together view (greyed out here, but will activate with participants):

Dropdown options, different views, as described

End Meeting

If you are the creator of a meeting, you now have the ability to either leave your meeting or end the meeting for everyone. This will prevent people from staying after you have left the meeting. Several faculty have wanted to know about this one for classes held in Teams!

Leave and end meeting options

How to Activate the New Meeting Experience

Do you want to try out this new meeting experience? First, be sure you are in the desktop application of Teams (not in browser).

1. Click on your bio pic or initials at the upper right of the screen. Select Settings.

Upper right, click on initials, select Settings

2. Stay on the general section, and scroll down until you see a series of checkboxes. Check the box next to “Turn on new meeting experience…”

Scroll down to option to turn on new meeting experience, check box

3. Restart Teams. This means completely quitting the program, which you may not do very often. To do this, right click on the Teams icon at the bottom of your screen and select Quit.

Right click on Teams icon and select Quit

4. Reopen Teams and enjoy your new meeting experience. Maybe even have a test meeting or two…

Thoughts?

Are you going to try out this new meeting view? I would love to hear what you think. I would also love to see you at Teams Essentials training!  Please check myTraining for a list of times. All sessions are currently being held remotely.

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

  • Candace Bolinger
  • Ashley Cervantes
  • Kyle Garwood
  • Jennifer Snyder
  • Andrea Wilson

PowerPoint: Morph Transition (plus video!)

Have you noticed a new transition in PowerPoint? It is hard to miss, since it is right at the front of the list. This new transition is called Morph, and it is pretty spectacular. That being said, it takes a little bit of tinkering to make it work correctly. Let’s take a look at how this works.

Morph Transition

Video

You can get a much better idea of how the Morph transition looks by seeing it in action. To this end, I made a video for you today… but I also included some more instructions below, so do read on when you are done watching!

Morph Transition

I hope you enjoyed seeing Morph in action in the video above. Here is a quick recap of some of the basics.

The Morph Transition is one of the first transitions listed in the updated  Transitions tab in PowerPoint (Office 365).

Morph Transition

Simply applying this transition to a slide, however, is often a deflating experience. If not set up correctly, Morph looks very similar to the Fade transition.

How to Set up a Transition

Luckily, Microsoft has included some handy instructions for successfully setting up the Morph transition. Hover your mouse over Morph for details:

Transitions Tab, Morph Instructions

To quote Microsoft:

  1. Duplicate a slide
  2. Move things around
  3. Apply the Morph Transition

Basically, Morph works the best when two slides are very similar, but contain some minor differences. These instructions are a great way to ensure that this is the case.

More Options: Working with Text

Working with text? You may need one more step… after you select the Morph transition, look to the right for Effect Options.

Effect Options

Try Words or Characters if you are working with a slide that is text, rather than objects. One of my very favorites is the Characters option:

WIchita Facts Slide Morphed by Character

Objects and Morph

In the video, I showed you a couple ways to incorporate different objects with the Morph transition. For instance, try using Shapes, and modifying them slightly in your “morphed” slide.

Weather Alerts Slide, morphed

SmartArt is another favorite with Morph. Just remember for best results to follow Microsoft’s recommendations: duplicate a slide, make some changes to the second slide, and then apply the Morph transition.

Colleges slide, morphed

You will have to let me know what sort of creative Morph ideas you come up with in your presentations!

Thoughts?

What do you think of the Morph transition? Did you notice this new transition in PowerPoint? Has this post inspired you to give it a try? I would love to hear from you!

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

  • Suzanne Hawley
  • Amy Solano

Teams: Notify Me When a Coworker is Available (or Offline)

With so many of our coworkers working remotely, it can become challenging to know who is really “here” and who has “left” at a given time. After all, we can’t exactly wave hello or goodbye as they walk past our desk! In lieu of these familiar “in person” notifications, here is a quick way to be notified virtually via Teams.

James Kirk is now available banner

Teams Settings

In the upper right of your Teams screen is either your image (at WSU this is imported from Outlook), or your initials. Click on this circle to access a variety of options. We are selecting Settings for this one.

Imae in upper right, setting option

Notifications

1. On the left side of the Settings screen, select Notifications.

2. Scroll all the way to the bottom under the header Status. Select Manage Notifications.

On left, notifications, at bottom status, Manage Notifications

3. In the search bar, Search for the person for whom you would like to be notified.

      • Quick Note: when searching for people in Teams, try searching by the wording in front of the @ symbol in their email address; e.g. firstname.lastname for faculty/staff, and initials lastname for students.

Add person to notifications

4. Select your person from the dropdown list. They will now appear in a list under Manage Status Notifications.

    • At any time you can revisit this setting and select Turn Off to stop receiving notifications.

Person in notifications, option to "turn off" notifications for them

Notification Banners

That is all there is to it! Now you will be notified when this person becomes available…

James Kirk is now available banner

And when they go offline…

James Kirk is now offline

Pretty cool!

Teams Essentials Training

Are you interested in learning more about Teams? I would love to see you in one of my remote Teams Essentials trainings! Sessions are listed in myTraining. There will always be a listing or two of this session, so if you don’t see a time that works for you, not to worry, simply select Notify me of new sessions to receive an an email when a new session is listed.

Notify me of new sessions link

Thoughts?

What do you think, will you activate notifications for any of your Teams contacts? I would love to hear from you!

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

  • Lora Lea Pickering
  • Mikayla Irish
  • Kelly Eden

PowerPoint: All About Audio

What happens when you insert audio into your PowerPoint presentation? For many, the little audio button that appears in the slide is a source of some confusion. What are you supposed to do with that button? Do you always need to press play during your presentation? What if you want audio to play across slides? Let’s explore some of PowerPoint’s audio options that are not readily apparent.

Audio Play button

Inserting Audio

Like visual elements, audio elements also live on the Insert tab in the ribbon.

1. Go to the Insert tab, Media group, and select the dropdown for Audio.

Insert tab, Media group, Audio dropdown

2. There are a couple options here, allowing you to browse for an existing mp3 file, or record your own audio.

Audio dropdown, audio on my pc and record audio options

  • Remember that if you are recording your own audio, you will need a computer with a functioning microphone.

3. Once Audio is selected or recorded, PowerPoint throws an audio button in the center of the slide…

Audio button in center of slide

This button can be moved around if desired.

audio button moved

Audio: During the Presentation

The default audio setting has this button appearing during a presentation, but we will explore how to make an adjustment if that is not what you were hoping…

Audio button in lower right of screen

Since no defaults have been changed so far, if we start this presentation, the presenter will either need to trigger the action with their clicker, or press the  Play button on top of the audio button with a mouse.

Playback Contextual Tab

Like so many contextual tabs, the Playback contextual tab that comes along with Audio in PowerPoint is often ignored, but there are so many amazing adjustments that can be made back here! Let’s check it out.

1. Be sure that you have Selected the audio button to trigger the appearance of the Playback contextual tab on the right side of the ribbon.

2. Select the Playback tab. Take a look at the Start dropdown in the Audio Options group. This will allow you to set audio to start automatically, rather than in a click sequence.

Playback contextual tab, start dropdown

3. The Audio Options group contains some additional settings that may interest you. Do you want to hide that audio button during a presentation? Have audio play across slides? There are checkboxes for these popularly requested settings, and more.

Playback tab, audio options group

4. Some popular preset settings are also available to the right of Audio Options group, in the Audio Styles group. Do you want audio to play in the background? Select this button, and some check boxes in Audio Options will be selected for you. With this setting, your audio will:

  • Play across slides
  • Loop until stopped
  • The audio button will be hidden during the presentation

Audio styles group makes changes to audio options

Thoughts?

What do you think, do these tips help you as you are working with audio in your PowerPoint presentations? I would love to hear from you!

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

Excel: Create Stunning Map Charts with Geography Data Types

Here is a question that has been particularly popular recently. How do you create a map charting figures by county, city or zip code in Excel? There are a variety of ways to tackle this question, but today I want to show you how to use data types in conjunction with the map chart type to create a chart by county in Excel.

County populations displayed on a map

This Byte is inspired by two different faculty members who emailed me with this question… you know who you are, and thank you for the inspiration!

Starting Place: The List

Your starting place should include clearly named locations and associated figures. In my case, I picked a few Kansas counties (sorry if I left out yours!), and their populations.  The numbers could have been any figure you are tracking, of course.

List of counties and populations

Step One: Convert to Geography Data Type

The first step is to make sure Excel can identify the locations listed in your document. This can be an optional step, but skipping it may mean that Excel can’t identify one or more of your locations and the map therefore won’t cooperate, so best practice is to start here.

1. Select the data to be identified (counties, in this case).

2. Go to the Data tab, Data Types group and select Geography.

Insert tab, data types group, Geography

3. Excel will attempt to identify the locations. If all goes well, a little map icon will appear to the left of the county name.

Locations identified, signified by a map icon on the left of county names

By the way, notice the little box at the upper right of your selection. Click on this to extract other pertinent information about your location. This is not part of your chart, but a cool trick in Excel worth mentioning.

Additional information about counties can be extracted at upper right

Here are a few extracted fields, so you can see how they look: image, largest city, area. Notice how Excel creates a new column for each one.

Information extracted, as described above

Here is a bit of inspiration: imagine that you have a list of zip codes and figures and you need to create a map by county. Simply convert the zip codes to geography data types, extract county, and off you go. Pretty handy, right?

Step 2: Create a Chart & Customize

Now that Excel has identified our data, we are ready to create a chart.

  1. Select the data to be charted. In this case, county and population columns.
  2. Go to the Insert tab, Charts Group
  3. Select the Map dropdown, Filled Map option.

Insert tab, charts group, Maps dropdown, filled map option

4. Excel will create a map with your data. If you don’t care for the default colors and appearance, don’t forget you can customize all your charts with the contextual Chart Design tab in the ribbon.

Contextual chart design tab

Shameless Training Plugs:  If you would like to learn more about the Chart Design contextual tab, please attend one of my Excel Pivot Tables, Charts and Pictures sessions (now offered remotely). Also, don’t forget you can easily change your theme colors on the Page Layout Tab in the ribbon. We cover this one in Excel Essentials if you are interested in learning more.

It may take a few tries to get a map you are happy with. Don’t be discouraged! The results are fantastic.

Kansas county by population map chart

One More Word on Geography Data Types

In the example above we mapped by county, but you may find yourself needing to map by zip code, state, country… the Geography data types can recognize all of these and more. Experiment with this powerful tool and you may be surprised what you find.

Thoughts?

What do you think, do you have any geographic data that is calling out for a better visualization? I can’t wait to hear how you use this feature!

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

  • Debbie Neill
  • Kelsey Unruh

Word: Convert Text to Table, or Table to Text… in 3 Clicks

There are a variety of reasons you may need to move text into (or out of) a table in Word. Sometimes you inherited a document with an odd layout, or you exported from another source, and  for whatever reason the text just looks odd. You could insert a table and copy and paste for half an hour, or you could do this little trick.

 

Comma delimited list transformed into a table

Starting Place: Comma (or Tab) Delimited Values

In my case, my starting values are separated by commas. This is common for a lot of text exported from other sources. But you may also run into documents that export with other delimiters, like tabs, paragraphs, semi colons, etc. Those can all be addressed.

Comma delimited list

Convert Text to Table

I am going to use the example of the comma separated values above.

1. Highlight the block of text.

2. Go to the Insert tab and select the Table dropdown. Select Convert Text to Table…

Insert tab, Table dropdown, Convert Text to Table

3. Word will guess the delimiter. In my case, Word has caught on that the values are separated by commas. Note you could change the delimiter under the Separate text at section, if Word does not pick up on it automatically.

COnvert Text to Table menu

4. Press OK and a simple table will be created with the text values you highlighted.

Simple table

Don’t forget… you have a lot of options for styles and formatting in the Table Design and Layout tabs.

Make sure you have clicked onto your table for these to appear, as they are contextual tabs.

Table Design and Layout contextual tabs

I always go for green for some reason…Table with green formatting

Convert Table to Text

Sometimes the inverse is true… you have inherited a document with a table and you need it to be converted to text. This can happen when you are trying to meet accessibility standards, or when an old table formatting just doesn’t behave well in modern versions of Office.

1. Click into your table to activate the Table Design and Layout contextual tabs.

2. Select the Layout contextual tab.

3. In the Data group, select Convert to Text.

Layout tab, data group, Convert to text button

4. You will have the option to choose how to separate your text at the existing cells. I chose Tabs for mine, but I may sometimes select Commas when I want to export as a comma separated value (CSV) file.

Convert table menu

5. The table is now a list of tab separated values, ready for you to work with outside of table formatting.List of tab separated values

Thoughts?

What do you think, will this save you some headaches in your Word documents? I would love to hear from you!

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

  • Denise Gimlin
  • Kelly Gurik
  • Debra Haslam
  • Alma Hidalgo
  • Angie Myrtle
  • Denise Northup
  • Tisha Whitehead

PowerPoint Feature Showcase Live Recording: Academic Resources Conference

Did you miss the PowerPoint Feature Showcase at the Academic Resources Conference on Wednesday? No problem… the session was recorded! This quick conference presentation is packed with power, showing off some new features and revealing some secrets you might now have known about this program.

Check out the recording from the live virtual event below. For the guide and exercises, please visit wichita.edu/arcms.

 

PowerPoint: Extract All Media with One Action

There are a variety of reasons that you may find yourself needing to extract all the media content (video, audio, pictures) from a PowerPoint presentation. This process can be especially cumbersome if you have a large presentation, where saving video from slides one at a time is a daunting prospect. Here is a cool hack if you find yourself in this position. By the way, this trick will extract pretty much all content, so even if you aren’t looking for media perse, you will find this interesting. Before we jump in, thank you to Taylor for having this question in PowerPoint Advanced training last week and inspiring this byte.

Media File

File Name Extensions

First thing’s first! This trick will be a lot easier if you have your file extensions visible. If they are not already (or if you are not sure), here is what you can do:

1. Open up any folder, or visit your File Explorer in your task bar.

2. Click in the View button at the top. This will pop out the ribbon in File Explorer (yes, there is a ribbon in here! I want to do a byte on this too!)

View Tab

3. In the Show/Hide group in the View tab, make sure that the box next to File name extensions is checked.

File name extensions

Duplicate File (optional)

This is optional, but we will be changing the file extension next… so if this is your first time and this is an important PowerPoint presentation, I would recommend duplicating it so you have an original version in case something goes awry.

Changing File Extensions

Here is the PowerPoint file, with some media attached. Now that we have turned extensions on, you can see the extension is .pptx.

PPT on desktop

If you are working with an older file, the extension may read as .ppt. If this is the case, you will need to resave it as the file type Powerpoint Presentation to bring it up to date (more about this here).

1. Click on top of the name of your file to highlight it, or right click and select rename.  Instead of renaming the file, however, we are going to change the extension.

2. At the end of the title, change the extension from .pptx to:  .pptx.zip

It will look like this:

Change extension to pptx.zip

3. Press Enter. You will receive a warning message. Click Yes.

Warning message

Note: You can always change the file extension back to .pptx the same way.

New File Appearance and Behavior

The appearance of the file changes. At initial glance, it looks like a normal zip file.

New extension with folder appearance

Double click on it, however, and you will find a variety of folders. Select ppt.

New folder for presentation with folders inside

Here are the “guts” of your Powerpoint…  including a file called media.

More folders, media folder circled

Inside the Media file are all the images and videos, including any slideshow recordings you have made that are tied in to your PowerPoint.

Media folder

Who knew it would be so easy to extract all this information?

Thoughts?

What do you think, will this help you with any of your projects, or did you find it interesting to see the “guts” of your PowerPoint presentation?

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

10 MORE Secret Commands in Microsoft Office

Almost immediately after I posted my Top 10 Favorite Secret Commands in Microsoft Office, so many more came to mind… So without further ado, here are 10 more commands that go above and beyond our usual well-known commands.

Ctrl + ; to insert date

Ctrl + K = Hyperlink

This command works in all your Microsoft Office programs, and other programs as well (like OU Campus!). Select your text, and rather than going through a right click menu, press Ctrl + K to access your hyperlink options.

Ctrl + K to insert hyperlink

Think about how quick this action can be if you have already copied your hyperlink, you can simply select text, Ctrl + K, Ctrl + V (paste), enter, and you are done.

Ctrl + ; = Insert Date (Excel)

This is different than the =TODAY function we talk about in Excel Advanced Formulas class. This command, Ctrl + ;  does not insert a formula; rather, it inserts today’s date as stagnant text.

Ctrl + ; to insert date

By the way, a similar command is Ctrl + Shift + ; to insert the current time.

Ctrl + 1, 2, 3… = Outlook Navigation

We have talked before about how Outlook has some incredible time-saving commands, and here is one of my favorites. Ctrl + (a number) will take you through the basic Outlook navigation.

Ctrl + a number for Outlook navigation

Here are the basic navigation commands in Outlook:

  • Ctrl + 1 = Mail
  • Ctrl + 2 = Calendar
  • Ctrl + 3 = Contacts
  • Ctrl + 4 = Tasks
  • Ctrl + 5 = Notes
  • Ctrl + 6 = Folders
  • Ctrl + 7 = Shortcuts
  • Ctrl + 8 = Journal

So the next time you are in your mail module, and want to take a look at your calendar, try Ctrl + 2 to quickly access it!

Ctrl + Shift + < or > = Adjust Text Size (Word, PPT)

Do you want to increase a block of text by exactly one font size? In Word or PowerPoint, select your text, then try the commands Ctrl + Shift + > to increase all selected  text by one font size or Ctrl + Shift + < to decrease.

Ctrl + Shift + > to increase size

Ctrl + [Drag] = Duplicate

We have talked about Ctrl + [drag] in Acrobat fillable forms, but did you know if works in Microsoft Office as well?

If you would like to duplicate a block of text in Word: select the text, hold down your Ctrl key, and with your mouse click and drag it to a new location. You will have an exact copy of the selected text.

Ctrl + drag to duplicate

Same story in Excel. Want to copy a block of cells? Select them, hold down the Ctrl key, and with your mouse click and drag them to their new location

Ctrl + Drag to duplicate

One note in Excel, you will want to hover your mouse on the line of selected text, until you see the four headed arrow cursor. Otherwise, Ctrl will simply deselect one of the cells in your group, rather than move them.

Four headed arrow

Ctrl + Shift + C = Copy Formatting

Almost like the Format Painter in command format… you know that Ctrl + C is copy, but did you know that Ctrl + Shift + C copies formatting?

This will work in most of your Microsoft Office programs. Select the text you would like to copy, and press Ctrl + Shift + C.

Ctrl + Shift + C to copy formatting

Select the text where you would like to copy the formatting, and press Ctrl + Shift + V. The Format Painter as a command, how cool!

Ctrl + Shift + V to Paste formatting

Ctrl + Alt + V = Paste Special

Ctrl + V is paste, and we just learned that Ctrl + Shift + V is use when copying formatting… here is another paste option: Ctrl + Alt + V will Paste Special. This will work in most of your Microsoft Office programs.

Frequently used in Excel, but also when transferring Excel data to Word… Select your data and copy (Ctrl + C), select the new location and press Ctrl + Alt + V to access Paste Special options.

Ctrl + Alt + V is paste special

Ctrl + Shift + $ = Currency Format (Excel)

There is nothing wrong with selecting a number format from the ribbon, but if you know you want currency, it could speed things up considerably to select your cells and press Ctrl + Shift + $.

Ctrl + Shift + $ to apply currency format

Ctrl + Shift + ! and beyond= Number Formats (Excel)

While you are looking at the numbers on your keyboard, try out a few more. Ctrl + Shift + ! will give you a standard Number format. Ctrl + Shift + % will give you percentages, and so on. Test out a few, and see if there are number formats you find yourself reaching for regularly.

Ctrl + Shift + ! to apply number format

Alt + F = File Tab

The Alt commands are a powerful tool in Microsoft Office. Alt will take you to the ribbon in your Office programs, and there are so many paths you can learn and memorize from there. Here is a great one to get you started:

Alt + F will take you to the File menu.

File is Alt F

From here, notice the highlighted letters letters on top of popular commands. S for Save, P for Print and so on…

File Menu options

Even if you don’t end up falling in love with all the Alt commands in the ribbon, Alt + F is an easy one to learn and utilize.

Thoughts?

What do you think, will you use these shortcuts to save time in Microsoft Office?

Congratulations, Power Users!

Congratulations to our newest Power Users! For the full gallery, and more information about the WSU Microsoft Office Power User Program, please visit: wichita.edu/poweruser

Stephanie Versch (Picture coming soon!)