Word: Citations and Bibliography

In Word Essentials training we talk about one time saving option in the References tab, the automatic Table of Contents.  If you thought that was cool, you are going to want to go back in time and redo all of your high school and college papers using the Citations and Bibliography features in the References tab.

Exercise File

To follow along, download the exercise file here: CitationsExercise

This document contains a lovely writeup about Microsoft Word that needs a couple citations (indicated by placeholders that read Source 1 and Source 2), and it also needs a Works Cited/Bibliography section. The two concepts go hand in hand, as we will see in the exercise. The yellow text box contains the source information for these citations. But enough back story, let’s jump in.

Write Up with Citation Placeholders

The Ribbon

For this exercise, we will work from the References Tab, Citations and Bibliography Group

Citations & BIbliography in the Ribbon

Step 1: Choose a Citation Style

In the Style dropdown, select the desired citation style; e.g. APA, MLA, Chicago.

  • The style you select will guide the fields that will appear in your Works Cited section

Style dropdown

Step 2: Insert Citations

  1. Remove the bold placeholder text that reads Source 1, and place your cursor at the end of the sentence where the placeholder text had been. Wherever your cursor is flashing is where the citation will appear.
  2. From the References tab, Citations & Bibliography group, select Insert Citation, Add New SourceInsert Citations Dropdown Menu
  3. For Type of Source select Article in a Periodical. Complete the fields that appear in the prompts by using the information in the gold text box. Press OK.Citations Prompts
    • Notice the Citation inserts where your cursor was:
      Citation in Document
  4. Now replace Source 2 placeholder text the same way, only select Journal as the Type of Source.
    • There are a couple additional fields you might want to add: Volume and Number.
    • Even though that doesn’t appear in the Fields list, you can check the box next to Show All Bibliography Fields and scroll down to see more fields and enter this additional information.Citations Prompts

Step 3: Insert a Bibliography or Works Cited

Now the easy part!

  1. Either remove the text box or click underneath it. The Works Cited will insert wherever your cursor is flashing.
  2. Go to the Citations & Bibliography group and select from the list of options.Bibliography dropdown
  3. A Works Cited list will appear where your cursor was.

Making Adjustments: Managing Sources

I see a typo from my data entry, so I want to change my source and update my Works Cited.

Typos in Works Cited

To edit or manage sources:

  1. Go to References tab, Citations & Bibliography group, select Manage Sources.Manage Sources Button
  2. Select the source to be edited and select Edit to make changes (optional).Edit Source button
  3. If any sources are edited or added, the Works Cited will need to be updated, just like the automatic Table of Contents we created in Word Essentials. The process is the same: right click over the Works Cited and select Update Field.Update Field Option

By the way, this is just the beginning of what you can do working with citations. There are also ways to transfer sources from old documents to new documents, to change citation styles mid paper, and so much more… but I promised a bite sized piece of information, so I must stop myself here!

 

I think you should go back to school and take a class or two just so you can play with this amazing feature in Word. I know a place where you can take some classes…

Outlook Formatting Woes: Replying to Email Sent from a Phone

You have probably experienced this scenario:

On your desktop Outlook you open an email that a coworker sends you from her phone.

Unformatted email

You notice that the formatting looks sparse, but you don’t think much about this until you start to compose your reply. Your signature looks different than usual, you can’t format text, or change fonts… even doing something simple, like making a word bold or italic, is impossible as a good portion of the ribbon is greyed out and unselectable. What is going on here?

Email response with no formatting options visible

When your coworker emailed you from her phone (or tablet), most likely the formatting of the entire email changed over to Plain Text. This means minimal to no formatting and no images, even for your responses to her email.

How to Fix

Want to hear the good news? You can fix this in two clicks.

Important: first, be sure that you are replying in a popped out message pane. We talk about this Pop Out view a lot in Outlook Essentials training, and how it opens up a whole new world of opportunities in the Outlook ribbon. This button lives right above the Send button in the Reply preview pane.

Pop Out button

Okay, are you ready for the two steps?

  1. Go to the Format Text Tab
  2. In the Format group, change the selection from Plain Text to HTML by pressing the HTML button.HTML Button

Go back to your Home and Insert tabs, and you will see that all of your options have returned. Happy day! Heads up though, if your signature is set to automatic, you may need to reinsert your signature to bring back the formatting in the signature.

Options returned to the ribbon

I hope this tip prevents some frustration for you in the future. No exercise files today, unless you would like me to send you an unformatted email from my phone to test out this setting… if so, you know where to find me!

Excel Text Formulas

We usually think about formulas in Excel in terms of numbers, but there are also a handful of formulas and functions for text.  The good news is, these functions are not only incredibly useful, they also happen to be user friendly! (we are looking at  you, complicated nested IF formulas)

Perhaps you have inherited a list of names in all lower case or all caps that you want to return to proper case… or vice versa, the list is in proper case and you long for a list in all caps (no judgement). Here is a quick way to transform that list in to the text case you want.

Follow along with the attached document NameList.

Let’s do Proper Case first as our template:

  1. Click into cell B2
  2. In the Formulas Tab, Click on the “Text” Function buttonText Button
  3. From the drop down list, select PROPER.
    Proper Command
  4. In the Function Arguments Box, Click in the white space next to text.Function Arguments
  5. Click on Cell A2 (or type A2)
  6. Click OK
  7. Double click on the autofill handle to carry the formula all the way down.

Autofill Handle

Nifty!

Results

Now try lower and upper case.  Follow the same instructions, but instead use the Text formulas for LOWER and UPPER in cells C2 and D2 respectively.

New Power Users:

Congratulations to the newest WSU Microsoft Office Power Users!

  • Ellen Abbey
  • Ross Powell

See the full gallery at wichita.edu/poweruser